May 8, 2015 10:00-11:00 AM PDT

Speakers:

Ray McDowell, California Department of Water Resources, FloodSAFE Environmental Stewardship and Statewide Resource Office (FESSRO), Ray.McDowell@water.ca.gov

Ron Melcer Jr., California Department of Water Resources, FloodSAFE Environmental Stewardship and Statewide Resource Office (FESSRO), Ron.Melcer@water.ca.gov

Stacy Cepello, California Department of Water Resources, FloodSAFE Environmental Stewardship and Statewide Resource Office (FESSRO), Stacy.Cepello@water.ca.gov

Description: Join us in exploring the efforts underway by the flood management community to contribute to the resilience and sustainability of riparian systems within the Central Valley.

Riparian systems and associated seasonal floodplains will play an important role in ecological adaptation to a changing climate. Within the arid and semi-arid west, these systems support a significant amount of plant and wildlife biodiversity on the landscape, despite occupying less than 2% of the land cover. They are resilient, having adapted to seasonal and annual variations in climate, and physical disturbance (e.g. flooding, channel migration). Furthermore, they provide essential connectivity across elevational and latitudinal gradients, and between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The Central Valley contains California's largest riparian systems, along the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, which are bounded in many reaches by flood risk reduction facilities. Many of these aging facilities now require repair or replacement, and a shift in public values over the past several decades has put a focus on flood system improvements which support ecosystem function. To address these needs, California Department of Water Resources (CDWR) is developing its second iteration of the Central Valley Flood Protection Plan (CVFPP) in an effort to reduce flood risk and make ecosystem improvements through structural and non-structural flood management activities within the Central Valley.

The Central Valley Flood System Conservation Strategy is an integral component of this effort.  It provides a framework for achieving ecological improvements within flood risk reduction projects by defining restoration targets, providing geographically specific measurable objectives, providing advance habitat mitigation for key sensitive species, and providing assistance with environmental permitting. Restoration targets include fundamental riverine processes, key habitats, focused species conservation, and proposed reductions in stressors like fish passage barriers. Measurable objectives have been developed based on the conservation and recovery needs of sensitive species including terrestrial and aquatic wildlife and plants which depend upon the riparian systems within the Central Valley. The CDWR is working closely with federal, state, and regional flood management and resource agencies, local stakeholders, and non-governmental organizations in developing multi-benefit flood risk reduction projects which address both flood risk management and ecosystem goals and objectives. Through these efforts, the flood management community and others will contribute to the resilience and sustainability of riparian systems within the Central Valley.

To join the webinar:

Call-in number: 1-866-737-4154; Passcode: 287 267 0

Meeting link: https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/j.php?MTID=mf6a44b0059415e4ed858501ae94e7f74

Event date: 
Friday, May 8, 2015 -
10:00am to 11:00am